Vulnerable to radicalization: depressed & disaffected

Might Depression, Psychosocial Adversity, and Limited Social Assets Explain Vulnerability to and Resistance against Violent Radicalisation?

Professor Kam Bhui and Professor Edgar Jones defining study reveals the common characteristics of those most vulnerable to recruitment by terrorists. This study tests whether depression, psychosocial adversity, and limited social assets offer protection or suggest vulnerability to the process of radicalisation. It found radicalised Britons were anxious, depressed and lonely. Along with depression, being financially comfortable and socially isolated were seen as common factors in those vulnerable to radicalisation.

Online article at www.plosone.org

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